Indigenous protesters march against Minas Conga mine in defense of their water and lands

Indigenous protesters march against Minas Conga mine in defense of their water and lands

In the same week that Newmont Mining, the second biggest gold mining company in the world, reiterated its intention to open the largest gold mine in Peru, mine opponents filed a human rights complaint with the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

Violent clashes over the mine led to the deaths of five protesters in July.

Newmont has long been planning the Minas Conga gold mine as an expansion of the nearby Yanacocha mine, which is almost played out. But the government recently denied a permit to expand Yanacocha, while construction of Minas Conga gold mine has been suspended since August.

Nevertheless, Newmont recently denied rumors that it would be pulling out of the region by 2016, insisting that it still plans to build more gold mines.

Several days later, anti-mines activists filed a complaint with the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, accusing the Peruvian government of violating their human rights during the July protests.

In other mining-related news Canadian-based Macusani Yellowcake Inc. announced plans to start major uranium mining in Peru within six years, which would make Peru the first major uranium mining nation in South America.